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Rezo's crooked clock tower


A legacy of Georgian puppeteer, Rezo Gabriadze, is a puppet theatre and a grand crooked clock tower. Outside the Rezo Gabriadze theatre in the Old City of Tbilisi, Georgia, stands a clock tower. Built to look as if it is old and about to fall over, it is a modern creation and a tourist attraction. A large metal beam appears to hold the clock upright.

The design of the tower, by Gabriadze, is a testament to the 30 years he spent creating and building the theatre from recycled objects. The crooked clock tower itself was built over four years, and was completed in 2011. The clock is functioning and strikes on the hour, with the opening of a window at the top balcony in which an angel strikes the bell.
















MARTINA NICOLLS is an international aid and development consultant, and the author of:- The Shortness of Life: A Mongolian Lament (2015), Liberia’s Deadest Ends (2012), Bardot’s Comet (2011), Kashmir on a Knife-Edge (2010) and The Sudan Curse (2009).


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